Improved security in Kenya sees a surge in tourism - CNBC Africa

Improved security in Kenya sees a surge in tourism

East Africa

by Trust Matsilele 0

Improved security in Kenya sees a surge in tourism. PHOTO: Wikipedia

The absence of major terror incidences has re-installed business confidence across Kenya, especially in the tourism sector; this is according to security and economic experts.

Martine Zeuthen, an international violent extremism expert told CNBC Africa that the Kenyan government has been making inroads in diluting extremism in the east African country through collaborative efforts with the civil society.

“Government and communities are collaborating better in counter terrorism strategies, and a lot of investment has been made in capacity building both for the civil society and law enforcement agencies,” Zeuthen told CNBC Africa.

“The problem of radicalisation is still on and threats for more attacks exist, what we are trying to address is enhancing the collaboration between law enforcement agencies and civil society so as to improve communication and build community resilience.”

The East African economic powerhouse, Kenya, last experienced a major terrorism attack within its borders last April when Al-Shabaab gunmen killed 147 university students in the North Eastern town of Garissa.

Following terrorism attacks at Garissa, the country’s tourism sector took a huge knock falling by 25 per cent in visitor numbers.

According to Kenya Tourism Board figures, the country lost a quarter of its visitors in the first five months of 2015 from 381,278 in 2014 to 284,313.

Zeuthen said her organisation was also trying to understand how radicalisation was happening across the country and also engaging youths who easily fall victim to radicalisation and influence of extremism.

“The youths we have been working with and findings from our research show that youths are looking for life questions through faith.”

The Kenyan government has been involving diverse religious leadership in the fight to thwart extremism and terrorism. 

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