Equity report reveals S.A white men still dominate top positions - CNBC Africa

Equity report reveals S.A white men still dominate top positions

Southern Africa

by Aviwe Mtila 0

In the 22 years of the countries democracy, racial dynamics at top management level remain largely unchanged. Photo: Wikimedia.

A recent report by the Commission for Employment Equity revealed that white males still occupy senior management positions in South Africa.

The report, which was released on Monday, shows that in the 22 years of the countries democracy, racial dynamics at top management level remain largely unchanged with only 14 per cent of black Africans holding these positions.

The Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde, spoke to CNBC Africa on the commission’s findings.

READ THE HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE CONVERSATION BELOW OR WATCH THE VIDEO:

“The findings are very similar. We’re finding that the rate and the pace at which transformation is happening is extremely slow. In some cases when one talks about disability, you find that there is actually a regression in terms of EE [employment equity].”

-          Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

“The report doesn’t give us a full picture. The report will give us an indication of how the organisation looks at all occupational levels. It will talk to us in terms of what the trends are in terms of recruitment, trends in terms of termination, trends in terms of skills development as well as in terms of promotion.”

-          Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

[video]

“One is able to make certain assumptions just based on what one is finding. In terms of where we sit as a commission, we’re quite keen to get behind the statistics and start having dialogues with the different organisations, specifically private sector, to understand what those reasons are.”

-          Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

“One of the reasons that is normally given [for not hiring black South Africans] is an issue of skill. We are hearing the message that skills are not available amongst the designated groups. But the reality is when you look at what is happening in universities, we’re having the bulk of people that are graduating as people from designated groups.”

-          Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

“When looking at promotions and skills development, you recognise that the rate at which white males and white females are being developed and promoted is at a faster pace, and they’re getting much more preference than people from designated groups and just based on that, one begins to make certain assumptions. One of the assumptions being that people are more comfortable with people that they’re familiar with, and there’s a perception that it is more risky to give responsibility to somebody they are unfamiliar with.”

-          Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

“Last year the commission hosted the first employment equity awards and at that stage we were able to showcase some of the organisations that have had a significant change. Pick ’n Pay, PetroSA and SABC came out quite good.”

Chairperson of the Commission for Employment Equity, Tabea Kabinde.

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