How would you rate an African president? - CNBC Africa

How would you rate an African president?

Special Report

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Goodluck Jonathan was among the presidents with lower approval ratings. PHOTOS: Global Village extra/Getty Images

According to a poll by US-based consulting company Gallup, presidents that made the top tier in terms of how well residents believed them to be doing their job included Mali’s Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, with 86 per cent approval and 12 per cent disapproval, followed by Botswana’s Ian Khama with 81 per cent approval, and 18 per cent disapproval, and Kenya’s Uhuru Kenyatta with 78 per cent approval and 18 per cent disapproval.

Presidents in the lower rung included Nigeria’s Goodluck Jonathan with 43 per cent approval and 50 per cent disapproval, followed by Liberia’s Ellen Johnson Sirleaf with 42 per cent approval and 45 per cent disapproval, and South Africa’s Jacob Zuma with 41 per cent approval and 58 per cent disapproval.

A citizen’s income level was also found to determine their approval or disapproval ratings of heads of states.

People that were living with a relatively comfortable income were more likely to approve their current head of state’s job performance. This was in contrast to those that were living a lot less well off than their counterparts, who were found to be more likely to disapprove of their head of state’s job performance.

The approval ratings for those that the Gallup survey deemed were “living comfortably on a present income” was at 58 per cent, and those that were described as getting by on their present income gave a 57 per cent approval rating.

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Those that were finding it difficult on a present income gave an approval rating of 48 per cent, and those that were finding it very difficult on a present income gave a 45 per cent approval rating.

The survey also examined the approval and disapproval ratings of residents of different ages, and found that within the African countries surveyed, residents that were 45 years old and older were more likely to approve of their current president’s job performance, in contrast to those aged between 15 and 25 years old, who were found to be less likely to be approving.

In Burkina Faso, for example, those aged between 15 to 24 year old gave a 61 per cent approval rating and those aged 45 years and older had an 81 per cent approval rating. Similarly, those between the aged of 15 and 24 years old gave a 78 per cent approval rating and those 45 years and older gave an 85 per cent approval rating.

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, however, those within the younger age bracket gave a 30 per cent approval rating, and those in the older age bracket gave an 18 per cent approval rating.

In Cameroon, those in the younger age bracket gave a 72 per cent approval rating and those in the older age bracket gave a 69 per cent approval rating. 

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