Oil prices slash Nigeria 2015 GDP growth - CNBC Africa

Oil prices slash Nigeria 2015 GDP growth

Western Africa

by Trust Matsilele 0

Nigeria's Finance Minister announced a $23 billion budget resting on a benchmark oil price of 65 US dollars a barrel. PHOTOS: Wikipedia

This depreciation projection was projected to the budget the finance minister presented to parliament on Wednesday.

(WATCH VIDEO: Nigeria slashes 2015 budget)

The naira lost 3.6 percent on the day, closing at a record low of 187.10 to the dollar, after the central bank said it would hold the last foreign exchange auction of the year on Wednesday, which triggered strong demand from some importers and forex end-users. The currency rarely reacts to budget news.

The 4.3 trillion naira ($23 billion) budget rests on a benchmark oil price of 65 US dollars a barrel, down from 77.50 US dollars in the 2014 budget, and a significant cut on previous budgets, Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala said. Revenue was 3.6 trillion naira.

The production forecast for oil was set at 2.27 million barrels per day, down slightly from this year's assumption of 2.38 million. The figures were in line with earlier comments by the minister this month.

Oil only accounts for about 15 percent of the GDP of Africa's biggest economy, but it makes up 75-80 percent of government revenues. Government finances have been hammered by a near halving of world oil prices since June.

"The budget seeks to protect the average Nigerian and you know that the key is that we focus on diversification of the economy," Okonjo-Iweala told journalists outside parliament.

"This budget points to the fact that this country is a non-oil country and I think we want Nigerians to begin to think of the country in that way."

(READ MORE: Nigeria must adjust to "permanent" oil price shock: Finance Minister)

Yet efforts to diversify over the years have had mixed results, and oil dependency is seen as the Nigerian economy's biggest systemic flaw.

Global investors have take been growing interest in Nigeria, but they worry about its tendency to squander its oil windfall on bloated government spending and patronage.

Comments