UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan: Localization of conflict and unaddressed community grievances serve as barriers to sustainable peace

Content provided by APO Group. CNBC Africa provides content from APO Group as a service to its readers, but does not edit the articles it publishes. CNBC Africa is not responsible for the content provided by APO Group.
Download logo

Members of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan began their seventh field mission to South Sudan, Uganda, Ethiopia, and Kenya earlier this week. The mission, currently underway, is taking place from 19 to 26 August 2019.

In Juba, Bentiu, and Yei (South Sudan), the Commissioners met with UN representatives, international organizations, and community members comprising religious leaders and civil society, including women’s groups, recent returnees, and internally displaced persons.

“We are deeply concerned that, despite overall armed conflict having waned considerably since the signing of the Revitalized Peace Agreement, little progress has been made to adhere to the terms of the agreement,” said Commission Chair Yasmin Sooka. “Civilians with whom we spoke still raised numerous concerns that they feel are barriers to sustainable peace,” she added.

Intercommunal violence premised on cattle-raiding has recently spiked in South Sudan, including in Bahr al-Ghazal. During their visit, the Commissioners listened to South Sudanese women, men, and children express numerous concerns including localization of conflict linked to land, resources, and cattle, continued impunity for sexual and gender-based violence, delays and inefficiencies in implementing the Revitalized Peace Agreement of September 2018 , deteriorating living conditions for those internally displaced, the securitization of the state and continued shrinking space for civic engagement, frustration with the functioning of the judiciary, and the absence of accountability mechanisms including establishment of the Hybrid Court, among others.

“Despite the numerous challenges we heard, we were encouraged by the fact that committees composed of military and civil actors have been formed to improve civil-military relations and support local justice and reconciliation in Yei River State, where civilians could raise dispute resolutions,” said Commissioner Andrew Clapham. “Such mechanisms that facilitate communication between armed actors and civilians could be replicated in other locations where violent conflict and violations have been witnessed in the country,” he noted.

Impunity for conflict-related sexual violence and sexual and gender-based crimes in South Sudan also remains at an all-time high, while survivors of sexual violence still have limited access to redress. In Bentiu, the Commission heard testimonies of sexual violence from women who are waiting to share their stories with an accountability mechanism. “The lack of progress in establishing transitional justice mechanisms, including the Hybrid Court, the commission for truth, reconciliation, and healing and the compensation and reparation authority, which are to be complemented by customary and other community-centred mechanisms, is delaying accountability and reparation for these and other crimes,” said Commission member Barney Afako. “So long as the voices of victims and survivors are not empowered, and these mechanisms not put in place, it is highly unlikely that South Sudanese women, men, girls, and boys will be able to witness a lasting peace,” he added.

In closing, the Commission stressed the importance of overcoming delays regarding the Revitalized Peace Agreement, and encouraged the positive work being carried out by the National Constitutional Amendment Committee.

The Commissioners will hold a press conference on Friday, 23 August 2019, at 1100 hrs in the UNMISS Tomping Base in Juba.

From 25 to 29 August 2019, the Commissioners will separately visit Uganda, Ethiopia, and Kenya, where they will engage with refugees who have been recently displaced from South Sudan. In Ethiopia, they will hold meetings with African Union leaders, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), senior UN officials, as well as other members of the international community.

The UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan is an independent body mandated by the UN Human Rights Council to, among other things; determine and report the facts and circumstances of, collect and preserve evidence of, and clarify responsibility for alleged gross violations and abuses of human rights and related crimes, including sexual and gender-based violence and ethnic violence, with a view to ending impunity and providing accountability. The Commission will present an oral update on the human rights situation in South Sudan to the Human Rights Council on 16 September 2019 and a comprehensive written report in March 2020.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

Related Content

Uganda moves to phased reopening amid rising of COVID-19 cases

In Uganda, according to president Yoweri Museveni, the country will go ahead with its plan to re-open the country despite recording more than 150 Covid-19 cases in three days. Moreover, European Union gives Uganda about $198 million to fund coronavirus response. CNBC Africa spoke to Qatahar Raymond Mujuni, a journalist for more.

COVID-19 lock-down: Rwanda permits taxi-moto operations & inter- provincial travel

This morning it was announced that taxi motos are now permitted to accept passengers again after over two months of being off the road due to the dangers around the spread of Covid-19. This is good news not only for many of the 45,000 taxi-motorists in the country that depend on the income, but also for the thousands of citizens that they transport daily. CNBC Africa spoke to analyst, Moses Gahigi for more.

NSE looks to deepen sustainable finance market segments in West Africa

The Nigeria Stock Exchange in collaboration with the Milken Institute is set to host the inaugural edition of the Webinar Series on Sustainable Capital Markets Forum geared towards promoting Green Finance in West Africa. Jude Chiemeka, Head of Trading Business Division of the Nigerian Stock Exchange joins CNBC Africa for more.

COVID-19: Nigeria eyes resumption of domestic flights from June 21st

Nigeria’s aviation sector may resume domestic operations from the 21st of June this year according to the Presidential Task Force on COVID-19. Meanwhile, the Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority says only five airports will be operational when the restrictions are lifted. Gbenga Olowo, President of the Aviation Roundtable joins CNBC Africa for more.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC AFRICA delivered to your inbox

More from CNBC Africa

Cannon Asset Managers CEO on how to position your portfolio for a depression

In 2006, little known economics professor Nouriel Roubini warned that the US housing market was at risk of collapsing. Fast forward two years and it did, triggering the global financial crisis. Roubini, now known is Dr Doom is forecasting another economic depression, contradicting the consensus view the recovery from Covid-19 will be V-shaped. Dr Adrian Saville, CEO of Cannon Asset Managers joins CNBC Africa for more.

How Covid-19 is driving demand for internet services

With students working from home, companies across industries forced to move online and video conferencing services being more utilized now than ever; broadband, WiFi and mobile data capacity seems to be getting tested like never before. So can internet service providers stand up to the test? Robert Nkeramugaba, Senior Network Operations Manager, BSC joins CNBC Africa for more.

Uganda moves to phased reopening amid rising of COVID-19 cases

In Uganda, according to president Yoweri Museveni, the country will go ahead with its plan to re-open the country despite recording more than 150 Covid-19 cases in three days. Moreover, European Union gives Uganda about $198 million to fund coronavirus response. CNBC Africa spoke to Qatahar Raymond Mujuni, a journalist for more.

Nigerian Equities Wrap: Market momentum wanes

The consumer goods index of the Nigerian Stock Exchange was among the top-performing indices in May. Onyeka Ijeoma, Analyst at Vetiva joins CNBC Africa to discuss what to expect from the equities market this week....

Partner Content

Sanlam Emerging Markets and its partners on the African continent invest over $12 million to fight COVID-19

As we go through this global pandemic together, it is the little things we miss. A high five, a handshake, a walk...

VIVO CEO is a dynamic leader for this innovative global brand

May 2020 -- Six months ago the vision for vivo in South Africa was just beginning to...

Trending Now

When a barrel of oil was cheaper than your coffee | CNBC International

Demand for oil has fallen to unprecedented levels, resulting in oil prices turning negative for the first time in history. From the price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia to the pandemic, CNBC’s Nessa Anwar explores what this might mean for the commodity in the long-term. ----- Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://cnb.cx/2wuoARM Subscribe to CNBC International TV on YouTube: https://cnb.cx/2NGytpz Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cnbcinternational Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cnbcinternational/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CNBCi...

COVID-19: Reopening aviation in South Africa

South Africa’s aviation sector partially reopened from Covid-19 lock-down’s this week, with the resumption of domestic business travel being allowed to take off. To understand what steps have been taken to maximise passenger safety at the country’s airports we speak with Refentse Shinners, Group Executive of Corporate affairs at the Airports Company of South Africa.

What It’s Like To Be A Professional Amazon Reviewer

Sean Cannell makes tens of thousands of dollars a month as a professional Amazon reviewer. As part of the Amazon Affiliate program, Cannell reviews camera gear on his Think Media YouTube channel and makes a cut of every sale those reviews generates o

Rebuilding South Africa’s construction sector

The COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with South Africa’s slowing economy has created a double setback for the construction industry. That’s according to financial services group Old Mutual. Last month construction firms, Group Five and Esor, both in business rescue announced that they would be delisting from the JSE. Today, WBHO warned annual profits would plunge 150 per cent, reflecting the impact of the Covid-19 lock-downs. Ian Woodley, Analyst: Old Mutual Equities and Arthur Karas, Portfolio Manager: Old Mutual Investment Group Macro Solutions join CNBC Africa for more.
- Advertisement -