Coronavirus – Africa: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) urges swift action to address violence against women and girls during the pandemic

Content provided by APO Group. CNBC Africa provides content from APO Group as a service to its readers, but does not edit the articles it publishes. CNBC Africa is not responsible for the content provided by APO Group.
Download logo

Governments across the world must act urgently to prevent and tackle the rising rates of violence against women and girls during the COVID-19 crisis by putting stronger measures in place such as designating shelters and hotlines as emergency services and supporting police and the justice sector during lockdowns, according to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Guidance from UNDP, Gender-based violence and COVID-19, also recommends developing new protocols to provide support via phone or online platforms rather than in person, expanding immediate response services in order to save lives, and most ensuring that steps to prevent gender-based violence are in every COVID-19 response plan and budget.

“Now more than ever there is a need to send a strong message that violence will not be tolerated, those who carry it out will be brought to justice, and survivors will be heard and supported,” said Raquel Lagunas, UNDP Gender Team Acting Director.

The impacts of the COVID-19 on women and girls include rising rates of domestic or intimate partner violence, while lockdowns and social distancing may be particularly hard on survivors of gender-based violence, who may already be economically dependent on their abusers.

Together with other UN agencies, UNDP is working with more than 40 governments around the world to prevent and address gender-based violence during the crisis.

Examples:

In Somalia, UNDP is supporting communities to develop neighborhood watch systems, where men and women receive training to regularly patrol their neighborhood to prevent or mitigate incidents of violence.

In Mexico UNDP, in collaboration with UN Women, is helping establish phone and online platforms to support vulnerable women via the LUNA centers, which are safe spaces for women and girls.

In Botswana, community members, including school principals, tribal chiefs, farmers and nurses, are raising awareness of the rise in violence and advising the government on village challenges and needs.

In Uganda, UNDP in partnership with Jumia Food Uganda, the leading e-commerce company in the country, is exploring how to incorporate messaging to prevent violence against women and girls in an e-commerce platform which connects small and medium-sized enterprises and informal market vendors to customers.

In the Dominican Republic, UNDP and BHD Bank are putting in place a partnership to facilitate referral services of domestic violence cases that are reported by the bank’s customers.

UNDP is coordinating with UN sister agencies and development partners, for example, through the Spotlight Initiative, a joint EU-UN partnership to end violence against women and girls. The global, multi-year initiative is targeting 50 million direct beneficiaries across five regions and more than 25 countries.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Related Content

BPN Rwanda: How the COVID-19 lock-down has impacted small businesses

The lock-down that Rwandan government enforced to curb the spread of COVID-19 saw over 60 per cent of entrepreneurs stop production and services. Monthly turnover also dropped from Rwf30 million to just Rwf4 million, according to a survey conducted by Business Professionals Network and the University of Rwanda. BPN Rwanda Managing Director, Alice Nkulikiyinka joins CNBC Africa for more.

Geoffrey Odundo on how the NSE is responding to COVID-19 crisis

The values of blue chip companies on the Nairobi Securities Exchange has increased despite the COVID-19 pandemic. CNBC Africa’s Arnold Kwizera spoke to the Chief Executive Officer at the Nairobi Securities Exchange, Geoffrey Odundo for more on this.

COVID-19: How is Ghana protecting its small and medium scale businesses?

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ghana has rolled out some palliatives including a 600 million cedis stimulus package for small and medium scale businesses with the aim of minimising the exposure of these businesses to the economic fallout of the pandemic. Joining CNBC Africa to discuss this initiative is Kosi Yankey-Ayeh, Executive Director of the National Board for Small and Medium Scale Industries in Ghana.

COVID-19 headwinds weigh on Nigerian oil companies

Capital imported to Nigeria’s oil and gas sector in the first quarter of the year was about 10.1 million dollars according to data by the National Burea of Statistics. The bureau also says the oil and gas sector grew by 5.06 per cent, recording an average oil daily production of 2.07 million barrels per day in the same quarter. Oyeyemi Oke, Oil and Gas Lawyer and a Partner at A02 Law joins CNBC Africa for more.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC AFRICA delivered to your inbox

More from CNBC Africa

Nigeria’s MPC cuts benchmark rate to 12.5%

In a surprise move, Nigeria Monetary Policy Committee cut its main policy rate by 100 basis points to 12.5 per cent and maintained other parameters constant in its third meeting of the year. Bismarck Rewane, CEO of Financial Derivatives and Muda Yusuf, Director-General of the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry joined CNBC Africa’s Wole Famurewa for a post-analysis of this decision....

How will MPC’S 100bps rate cut impact equities?

Following Nigeria’s Monetary Policy Committee's decision to cut the benchmark interest rate to 12.5 per cent, Ahmed Jinad a Research Analyst at Meristem Securities joins CNBC Africa to discuss the implication of this move on Nigeria’s equities market....

Trump’s Renewed Fight With China Explained

The Trump administration and the Chinese government are going head to head over the coronavirus. The two largest economic powers in the world are trying to control the coronavirus narrative. The White House has accused China of misleading the world a

How to address Africa’s ventilator shortage

Ventilators are an essential tool in the fight against Covid-19. But the continent is suffering from a severe supply shortage. Statistics show there are fewer than 2000 ventilators serving millions of people in Africa. In an attempt to fill the air in Africa’s ventilator market, Uni-Life 100 has launched a new ventilator system to provide mass treatment to patients across the continent. Bob Elshove, Sales Director at Unique Group joins CNBC Africa for more.

Partner Content

Building Africa’s Biggest Digital Classroom

An enduring lesson learnt throughout our 175-year existence is that, while things rapidly change around us, the things that truly matter don’t!...

Op-Ed: Africa’s people-led approach to combat COVID-19 shows signs of progress and leadership

In its fight against the spread of COVID-19, our continent faces a massive challenge that requires unprecedented levels of unity and coordinated action. These are the actions the African Union is taking to fight the pandemic.

Trending Now

Zuckerberg defends Facebook from Trump’s crackdown and everything else you missed: CNBC After Hours

CNBC.com’s MacKenzie Sigalos brings you the day’s top business news headlines, and what to watch as the coronavirus pandemic continues to keep most of America on lockdown. On today’s show, Mark Zuckerberg tells CNBC why Facebook is not an “ar

Central Bank of Nigeria cuts benchmark lending rate to 12.5%

Nigeria’s central bank cut its benchmark lending rate to 12.5% from 13.5%, the central bank governor said on Thursday.

How COVID-19 impacts access to sustainable energy in SSA

The World Bank says despite accelerated progress over the past decade, the world is expected to fall short of the SDG 7 target. In its just-released 2020 edition of the Energy Progress Report, the World Bank says under current policies, an estimated 8 per cent of the global population will not have access to electricity by 2030, and 90 per cent of them will be in sub-Saharan Africa. Makhtar Diop, the Vice President for Infrastructure at the World Bank joins CNBC Africa to discuss the findings of this report.

How Africa is hooking up the wilderness with the universe to help NASA in the space race.

Work at the Deep Earth Station is likely to see the biggest influx of people and equipment into Majtiesfontein since the Anglo-Boer War when it was home to British 12,000 troops.
- Advertisement -