Coronavirus – Africa: Lake Chad Basin – Complex Emergency Fact Sheet

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HIGHLIGHTS

4.6 million people in the Lake Chad Basin may require emergency food assistance through August

OAG violence continues to disrupt agricultural production and livelihoods across the Lake Chad Basin

Severe weather in late May and June results in displacement and increased needs among populations in Borno

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KEY DEVELOPMENTS

Violence continues to endanger civilians and prompt displacement across the Lake Chad Basin region, comprising Cameroon’s Far North Region, Chad’s Lac Region, Niger’s Diffa Region, and northeastern Nigeria’s Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states. On June 13, organized armed group (OAG) elements attacked northeastern Borno’s Monguno town, resulting in multiple civilian deaths and injuring nearly 40 individuals. The perpetrators also targeted the town’s humanitarian hub, though no aid workers sustained injuries, according to the UN.

Conflict-affected populations throughout the Lake Chad Basin continue to face acute food insecurity. The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) projects that many vulnerable populations in Diffa, Far North, and northeastern Nigeria may experience Crisis—IPC 3—or worse levels of acute food insecurity through at least August without emergency assistance. In addition, efforts to contain the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have negatively affected livelihoods, restricting access to food and other essential goods and services, according to food security actors.

In June, the UN released revised 2020 Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP) for Cameroon and northeastern Nigeria, which request $386 million and nearly $1.1 billion, respectively. The Cameroon HRP aims to target 3.4 million people with emergency assistance, while the northeastern Nigeria appeal plans to provide aid to 7.8 million people—a total increase of 2.7 million people compared to the HRPs released in March, prior to the onset of COVID-19 in the region.

USAID/BHA partners continue to respond to acute needs in conflict-affected areas of the Lake Chad Basin. In May, a USAID/BHA non-governmental organization (NGO) partner provided safe drinking water to nearly 17,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Borno

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

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