Coronavirus – South Africa: Premier Alan Winde on Coronavirus COVID-19 cases for September

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As of 1pm on 7 September, the Western Cape has 3111 active cases of COVID-19, with a total of 106 257 confirmed cases and 99 176 recoveries.

Total confirmed COVID-19 cases

106257

Total recoveries

99176

Total deaths

3970

Total active cases (currently infected patients)

3111

Tests conducted

491 434

Hospitalisations

678 with 152 in ICU or high care

Cape Metro Sub-districts:

 Sub-district

Cases

Recoveries

Western

9271

 8761

Southern

9574

 8906

Northern

6617

6280

Tygerberg

13187

 12477

Eastern

10056

 9443

Klipfontein

9101

 8371

Mitchells Plain

8534

 8023

Khayelitsha

8270

 7789

Total

74610

70050

Sub-districts:

 District

 Sub-district

Cases

Recoveries

Garden Route

Bitou

588

541

Garden Route

Knysna

1392

1292

Garden Route

George

3403

3127

Garden Route

Hessequa

282

254

Garden Route

Kannaland

111

107

Garden Route

Mossel Bay

2201

2035

Garden Route

Oudsthoorn

1264

978

Cape Winelands

Stellenbosch

2012

1889

Cape Winelands

Drakenstein

4254

3988

Cape Winelands

Breede Valley

3333

3100

Cape Winelands

Langeberg

1120

1051

Cape Winelands

Witzenberg

1562

1421

Overberg

Overstrand

1545

1465

Overberg

Cape Agulhas

275

256

Overberg

Swellendam

294

261

Overberg

Theewaterskloof

1154

1087

West Coast

Bergrivier

415

379

West Coast

Cederberg

163

151

West Coast 

Matzikama

367

295

West Coast

Saldanha Bay Municipality

1353

1273

West Coast

Swartland

1525

1393

Central Karoo

Beaufort West

546

447

Central Karoo

Laingsburg

130

109

Central Karoo

Prince Albert

22

16

Unallocated: 2336 (2211 recovered)

Data note: It is not always possible to check and verify that the address data supplied for each new recorded case is correct, within the time frames required to provide regular and timely updates. This means that in some instances, cases could be allocated to the wrong sub-districts. We are working with the sub-districts to clean and verify the data and where errors are picked up locally, cases will be re-allocated to the correct areas. 

More data is available here: https://bit.ly/2BsfdXt

The Western Cape has recorded an additional 9 deaths, bringing the total number of COVID-19 related deaths in the province to 3970. We send our condolences to their family and friends at this time.

Continued decline in case numbers in alert level 2:

The Western Cape continues to record promising signs of decline in hospitalisations (which have dropped below the 700 mark), test positivity rate and deaths in the province. These are positive signs that the Western Cape's management of the virus through our healthcare and hotspot interventions, as well as the continued vigilance of our residents, is paying off. 

These indicators show that three weeks into alert level 2, with more businesses open, more people returning to their workplaces and more people moving around, there has not been an uptick in new cases. With the appropriate safety measures in place, we can reopen further, and save jobs while also saving lives.

There are, as yet, no tools that can indicate whether we will see a resurgence in the virus, or when. We continue to track the numbers and all of the indicators available to us closely as we monitor the situation. The Department of Health in the Western Cape is involved in various surveillance studies which allows us to use data to manage and monitor the virus.

We encourage residents of the Western Cape to go out and to support businesses wherever they can but to do so safely. In the absence of a vaccine, behaviour change is the most powerful weapon that we have against COVID-19.

Residents can play their part by:

Wearing a clean mask when you are outside of your home. This mask must be worn correctly, covering your nose and mouth, and must be put on and removed safely. Regular handwashing with soap and water or hand sanitizers. This remains an important infection control mechanism against a number of illnesses and should be a part of all of our daily routines.  Keeping a distance of 1.5 metres between yourself and any other person. As we all leave our homes more, this will become even more important in queues, in shops, public places and in work spaces. Surface hygiene and regular wiping of high traffic surfaces such as counter tops, door handles, light switches, elevator buttons and other shared surfaces remains important. If you must cough and sneeze, do so into a tissue which you can throw away, or into your elbow. If you are not feeling well, the best thing you can do for your own health and the health of those around you, is to stay at home. 

Issued by: Western Cape Office of the Premier

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of South African Government.

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