Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed wins 2019 Nobel Peace Prize

OSLO (Reuters) – Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for his peacemaking efforts with Eritrea.

Ethiopia and Eritrea, longtime foes who fought a border war from 1998 to 2000, restored relations in July 2018 after years of hostility. [nL8N1U5180]

The prize, worth nine million Swedish crowns, or around $900,000, will be presented in Oslo on Dec. 10.

“Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded this year’s Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea,” the Norwegian Nobel Committee said in its citation.

The Nobel Peace Prize will be presented in Oslo on Dec. 10, the anniversary of the death of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who founded the awards in his 1895 will.

Reporting by Gwladys Fouche and Terje Solsvik in Oslo, Maggie Fick and Katharine Houreld in Nairobi; Editing by Andrew Heavens

Related Content

Rwanda to host East Africa Tourism Platform secretariat

It was announced this week that Rwanda has been confirmed as the newest host of the secretariat for the East Africa Tourism Platform. The body, which was established back in 2011, has received $250,000 as part of a two year partnership deal with Trademark East Africa to support its operations. So as the struggling tourism industry gears up for a comeback, what’s the next move? CNBC Africa spoke to the DG of the Rwanda Tourism Chamber, Frank Gisha Mugisha for more.

Ethiopia deploys military as Hachalu Hundessa protests turn deadly

Ethiopia continues to suffer unrest after the killing of a popular musician on Monday sparked protests that have claimed over 80 lives. Political and Economic Analyst, Mikael Arage joins CNBC Africa for more.

Tanzania reaches middle income status

Tanzanian President John Magufuli yesterday tweets about the country’s World Bank middle income status; the Bank of Tanzania’s monthly review for May shows promise for exports and optimism for a speedy economic recovery post Covid-19. Bankable Partner, Ivan Tarimo joins CNBC Africa for more.

COVID-19: How the disruption in global supply chains is impacting FDI in developing countries

COVID-19 has not only been a health crisis but also an economic one. With supply chains distorted and massive capital flight experienced the economic effects for many African countries is massive, Richard Bolwijn, Head of Investment Research, Division on Investment & Enterprise United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, UNCTAD joins CNBC Africa for more.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC AFRICA delivered to your inbox

More from CNBC Africa

Zimbabwe’s health minister, accused of corruption, sacked: statement

HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa has sacked health minister Obadiah Moyo with immediate effect for inappropriate conduct, a statement from...

Senegal slave island, moved by George Floyd’s death, renames Europe Square

“But we also said to ourselves...that in another sense it is celebrating the persecutor,” he said. “What happened to George Floyd was the final straw.”

Ivory Coast’s 2020 growth seen sliding to 0.8% due to pandemic

ABIDJAN (Reuters) - Ivory Coast’s gross domestic product growth is expected to slow to 0.8% in 2020 compared to a previous forecast...

Omnia delivers solid results from a stabilised business

South Africa's biggest fertilizer producer Omnia was profitable in the year to March after extensively restructuring its business units. Omnia CEO, Seelan Gobalsamy joins CNBC Africa to breakdown the results.

Partner Content

Maktech’s Godwin Makyao: Now Is A Time of Entrepreneurial Opportunity in East Africa

As an executive decision-maker in both the telecommunications and tourism industries, Godwin Makyao could not have experienced a more diverse set of...

Sanlam launches urgent job-preservation initiative in response to COVID-19

Sanlam Investments is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic through large-scale support of the recovery of South African companies, from small enterprises to...

Trending Now

Parts of South Africa’s Edcon set for sale to Durban-based retailer

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Parts of South African retail chain Edcon are likely to be sold to private equity-backed Retailability Ltd, administrators in...

Africa to rebound from pandemic slump in 2021 but damage done: AfDB

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - Africa is expected to partially rebound next year from a pandemic-induced economic slump, but it could still lose nearly...

Chinese factories to face headwinds in next phase of post-lockdown recovery

The rosy outlook stands in stark contrast to the dismal industrial landscapes of other economies still fighting COVID-19. Factory output plunged further in May from a year earlier in Japan, South Korea and the United States. Euro zone manufacturing output fell by a record 28% in April.

WHO acknowledges ‘evidence emerging’ of airborne spread of COVID-19

But in an open letter to the Geneva-based agency, published on Monday in the Clinical Infectious Diseases journal, 239 scientists in 32 countries outlined evidence that they say shows floating virus particles can infect people who breathe them in.
- Advertisement -