JSE’s 2017’s new listings beat 2016 number, here’s the full list…

In 2017 the JSE added 21 new listings to its main board and its Alternative Exchange – AltX, this was up almost 17 per cent from the prior year which saw 18 listings.

Prejelin Naggan, Head of Primary Markets, at the JSE says that while South Africa’s economic growth  remained under pressure throughout 2017, the JSE saw an increase in the number of listings on the exchange compared to 2016, (see graph below). On 15 December, she adds Alphamin Resources Corp. became the 19th company to list on the JSE in 2017, after listings in sectors including investment instruments, retail, financial services and basic resources earlier in the year. The year ended with the listing of African Equity Empowerment Investments Limited Group’s AYO Technology, a B-BBEE ICT Group that offers numerous end to end solutions.

AYO is the largest listed black economic empowered ICT company in South Africa, with at least 30 per cent of the company owned by women. 49 per cent by AEEI and a number of unions, amongst others the South African Clothing and Textile Workers Union (Sactwu), the Police and Prison Civil Rights Union (Popcru) and the Federation of Unions of South Africa (Fedusa).

Main BoardCompany
MainPremier Food Fishing Ltd
MainSea Harvest Group Ltd
AltXPembury Lifestyle Grp Lt
MainLong 4 Life Limited
AltXMaster Plastics Limited
AltXAvior Cap Market Hldg LD
MainKaap Agri Limited
AltXAEP Energy Africa Ltd
MainNEPI Rockcastle Plc
MainRH Bophelo Limited
AltXHeriot REIT Limited
MainAfrican Rainbow Capital Investments Limited
MainOrion Minerals NL
MainSteinhoff Africa Retail Limited
MainStadio Holdings Limited
MainBrainworks Limited
AltX4Sight Holdings Ltd
MainSandown Capital Ltd
AltxAlphamin Resources
AltxCastleview Property Fund
MainAyo Technology Solutions

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