Ex-CEO Peter Moyo plans to take Old Mutual to court

JOHANNESBURG, June 18 (Reuters) – Former Old Mutual CEO Peter Moyo is to challenge the employer’s conduct in court after the insurer fired him citing a conflict of interest.

A statement by Moyo’s lawyer said Old Mutual had suffered no financial or other prejudice as a result of any action from Moyo.

Reporting by Emma Rumney. Editing by Jane Merriman

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