Tag: Africa growth

Op-Ed: Capturing Africa’s high returns

Professor Landry Signé | Stanford University Since 2000, at least half of the world’s fastest-growing economies have been in Africa. And by 2030, Africa will be home to 1.7 billion people, whose combined consumer and...

AfDB’s Adesina is dreaming of double digit growth for Africa

"Everyone knows Africa is the place to invest," he smiled as he breezed into the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland on Tuesday

How Africa can negotiate an effective continental free trade area agreement

  Calestous Juma |Harvard University African countries are forging ahead to complete negotiations for a continental free trade area between 55 countries by early next year. The idea, adopted by the African Union in...

Why the private sector’s hype about the African middle class isn’t helpful

Henning Melber | University of Pretoria The African middle class is of huge interest to business. This was confirmed again recently by well attended seminars in South Africa’s big cities to discuss “African Lions:...

Senegal – Sub-Saharan Africa’s good news story

Charlie Robertson | Renaissance Capital We think Senegal is one of the good news stories in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), which will be reinforced as GDP is revised up by perhaps 30% in 2018. Senegal was...

The ‘Africa rising story’ was based on faulty logic – here’s how to fix it

Lorenzo Fioramonti | University of Pretoria Until a couple of years ago, all financial institutions and investment banks were celebrating ‘Africa Rising’, in a symphony of compliments that should have cautioned any reasonable African leader...

Sub-Saharan Africa economic growth to pick-up next year

Nigeria and South Africa are expected to lift sub-Saharan regional growth next year, a Reuters poll showed, once their central banks cut rates to boost Africa’s largest - but sickly - economies. The...

Op-Ed: Growth is dying as the silver bullet for success. Why this may be good thing

The idea that the economic “pie” can grow indefinitely is alluring. It means everybody can have a share without limiting anybody’s greed. Rampant inequality thus becomes socially acceptable because we hope the...
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