Jumia closes e-commerce business in Tanzania two weeks after shutting down in Cameroon

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) – Online retailer Jumia Technologies, often called “the Amazon of Africa,” has closed its e-commerce business in Tanzania, it said in a statement on Thursday, less than two weeks after shutting down in Cameroon.

“As part of our ongoing portfolio optimisation effort, Jumia has come to the difficult decision to cease our operations in Tanzania effective on November 27,” the company said in a statement.

Reporting by Joe Bavier; editing by Jason Neely

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