Kenya’s law on free sanitary towels for schoolgirls: To what extent is government keeping its word?

In June 2017, the government of Kenya passed a historic law to give free sanitary towels to school girls aiming at minimizing absenteeism and putting them at par with their male counterparts. Despite the government allocating about $4.7 million in the 2017/2018 financial budget towards this, there are still complaints and accusations to the government on them not keeping their word. Monicah Muhoya, Founder, Heels4Pads joins CNBC Africa for more.

Related Content

COVID-19: Vetiva Capital’s fiscal outlook for Nigeria

Vetiva Capital Management says although Nigeria’s total debt to GDP ratio is below the suggested prudential upper band of 40 per cent for developing economies, a higher than projected fiscal deficit, high cost of borrowing and weaker Naira may further limit Nigeria’s fiscal space and reduce the capacity to respond to the Covid-19 crisis. Mosope Arubayi, Chief Economist at Vetiva joins CNBC Africa for more.

Why Africa’s next generation of writers should embrace digital publishing

Are Africa’s literary traditions on the wane? Or are we not notiving this generation’s breed of Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebes? CNBC Africa’s Arnold Kwizera spoke to Comic Republic’s Jide Martin on the future of the industry.

East African Breweries CEO shares how the company is responding to the COVID-19 challenges

The brewing industry has always attracted double digit growth due to the demand of beer, wine and other spirit drinks. The Covid-19 pandemic has however dealt a hard blow to the industry, with bars and pubs forced to close as part of the measures to curb the spread of the disease. Andrew Cowan, Group Managing Director and CEO, East African Breweries Limited joins CNBC Africa for more.

How businesses in East Africa can adapt and built resilience in the face of COVID-19

COVID-19 has had a significant economic impact across East Africa, from macro to consumer-level. Global shocks and local restrictions aimed at curbing the virus spread have severely impacted businesses across sectors but how can they bounce back? CNBC Africa’s Arnold Kwizera spoke to Mills Schenck, Managing Director and Partner at the BCG Nairobi for more.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC AFRICA delivered to your inbox

More from CNBC Africa

South Africa’s National Treasury says “no further action” to bailout SAA airline

CAPE TOWN (Reuters) - South Africa’s National Treasury said on Friday there was “no further action” planned to bailout struggling national airline...

What Does The Future Of Air Travel Look Like?

Of all the industries the coronavirus pandemic has affected, the airline industry is among those that have been hit the hardest. According to the International Air Transport Association, airlines' passenger revenue is estimated to sink by over $300 b

Fitch expresses doubt over SA’s debt consolidation plans

Just last week finance minister Tito Mboweni outlined the emergency budget to nurse South Africa through the Covid-19 crisis. A big part of this budget was a plan for South Africa to get its debt under control within four years. Fitch Ratings, the agency that downgraded South Africa in April doubts whether South Africa can do this. CNBC Africa’s Chris Bishop spoke to Jan Friederich, Senior Director of Fitch Ratings for more.

Rwanda, USAID sign over $643.8 mn deal to support trans-formative development

Rwanda has signed a financing agreement with the USAID worth about $643.8 million to support Rwanda’s development efforts in the next five years. Moreover, Rwanda Convention Bureau announced the reopening of meetings and conferences. Edwin Ashimwe, Journalist with The New times joins CNBC Africa for more.

Partner Content

Sanlam launches urgent job-preservation initiative in response to COVID-19

Sanlam Investments is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic through large-scale support of the recovery of South African companies, from small enterprises to...

Is Market Volatility Here For The Foreseeable Future?

Content provided by CompareForexBrokers Prior to understanding why market volatility might be here to stay for the foreseeable future,...

Trending Now

South Africa’s Capitec forecasts 70% profit fall in blow to shares

(Reuters) - Capitec Bank forecast a fall of at least 70% in first-half earnings on Friday due to a spike in bad...

Land Bank default forces S.Africa’s central bank into $200 mln bailout of state investment arm

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africa’s central bank has issued a 3.45 billion rand ($200 million) guarantee to bail out the Corporation for...

Zimbabwe’s Landela agrees to buy state-owned gold mines, seeks more assets

HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwe’s Landela Mining Venture has reached agreements to take over and revive four idle state-owned gold mines and is...

How Zimbabwe farmers will be trained how to farm with a scheme from Belarus with love

When the farm invasions were unleashed by the people in power in 2000, it led to bloodshed and random confiscation that reaped a bitter harvest of lost production and exports that persists until this day. That year with all of its fumbling fury fuelled with the idea that to get rich you merely had to own a farm, is always seen as a turning point for the industry. It created a large slice of the country’s GDP and as it fell, so did the fortunes of Zimbabwe.
- Advertisement -