Chris Bishop

Chris Bishop is the head of programming of CNBC Africa. He has spent 37 years in journalism. He has tackled print, radio and TV and spent 20 years reporting on the African story. In 2011, Bishop won South Africa’s ‘Sanlam Award for Excellence in Financial Journalism’ and in 1988 he had won the ‘Sir David Beattie Award’ for exposing a cover-up of an assassination attempt on the Queen. Bishop has reported for the BBC in London; CNBC Africa; SKY News; TVNZ and the SABC where he was also national news editor and senior executive producer of TV News. In 2013, Chris Bishop took the prestigious “Special Editor of the Year Award” at the annual PICA Awards event
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Chris Bishop

Chris Bishop is the head of programming of CNBC Africa. He has spent 37 years in journalism. He has tackled print, radio and TV and spent 20 years reporting on the African story. In 2011, Bishop won South Africa’s ‘Sanlam Award for Excellence in Financial Journalism’ and in 1988 he had won the ‘Sir David Beattie Award’ for exposing a cover-up of an assassination attempt on the Queen. Bishop has reported for the BBC in London; CNBC Africa; SKY News; TVNZ and the SABC where he was also national news editor and senior executive producer of TV News. In 2013, Chris Bishop took the prestigious “Special Editor of the Year Award” at the annual PICA Awards event

Chris Bishop

Chris Bishop is the head of programming of CNBC Africa. He has spent 37 years in journalism. He has tackled print, radio and TV and spent 20 years reporting on the African story. In 2011, Bishop won South Africa’s ‘Sanlam Award for Excellence in Financial Journalism’ and in 1988 he had won the ‘Sir David Beattie Award’ for exposing a cover-up of an assassination attempt on the Queen. Bishop has reported for the BBC in London; CNBC Africa; SKY News; TVNZ and the SABC where he was also national news editor and senior executive producer of TV News. In 2013, Chris Bishop took the prestigious “Special Editor of the Year Award” at the annual PICA Awards event
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